Walt Disney & Warner Brothers Vintage Animation Art Gallery

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  • Animation Sensations
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Animation Sensations has been a world leading Animation Art Gallery since 1989. We specialize in buying and selling original vintage and contemporary animation art from Walt Disney, Warner Brothers, Hanna Barbera, Peanuts, Linda Jones Enterprises and other animation studios. 

Our vast collection of original animation art includes production cels, production drawings, storyboards, layouts, original backgrounds, and limited edition cels featuring some of the most beloved characters ever brought to life by the world's best animators.

Buying or selling animation art? Look no further than Animation Sensations for the best, most professional animation gallery found anywhere in the world!

E-mail us for more information at:

peter@animationsensations.com

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  • Original Walt Disney Production Cel from The Little Mermaid featuring Ariel

    "Who says that my dreams have to stay my dreams?” - Ariel

    Brave, beautiful, and bold; Ariel is an independent, headstrong and determined young mermaid. She first captured our hearts in the 1989 classic “The Little Mermaid” and continues to be a Walt Disney fan favorite.

    Ariel was the first of the modern princesses and greatly influenced the princesses that followed her including Belle, Jasmine and Pocahontas. She set the tone of the new Disney princess who was a little more rebellious and outspoken. Blogger and fan Michella Domenici says “Even without her voice, even in a world that is nothing like hers, Ariel doesn’t change who she is. She’s out of her element, but doesn’t try to blend in, or minimize her personality. Ariel is wholly herself, on both sea and land, and I think her self-confidence makes her a great role model for girls.”

    However the original leading ladies, Snow White, Cinderella, and Aurora also inspired generations. Jodi Benson, the voice of Ariel, also grew up with Disney Princesses as role models. “I grew up with 'Cinderella.' So that was my go-to Disney film, definitely. It was princess-related, and coming from a smaller area in Illinois and wanting to do something greater than myself in Broadway, that was a film that I could really relate to.” 

    Own a piece of animation history today! Call for value

  • Disney Animation Art Limited Edition Cel, "Bare Necessities"

    The original limited edition cel  “Bare Necessities” features the most fun-loving bear in Disney history: Baloo!

    Allegedly, Walt Disney chose Phil Harris to voice Baloo after meeting him at a party. However, when asked to do a test for The Jungle Book Harris said "I don't do voices.” Walt Disney did not give up. “They kept calling and saying, ‘You know, Phil, [Walt Disney] really wants you for this movie,” Harris recalled. 

    The start of his first day back in the recording studio didn’t go so well. Phil Harris found Baloo’s tone wooden and boring, so he asked if he could try a little improvisation. Once given the go-ahead, he began to have some fun. "I came out with something like, 'You keep foolin' around in the jungle like this, man, you gonna run across some cats that'll knock the roof in." Harris said. Walt Disney loved Baloo’s new personality and rewrote lines to suit the style.

    Disney animators Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston wrote in their book The Illusion of Life: "When Walt heard Phil's test track he loved it, even to the point of starting to act out how the bear would come dancing into Mowgli's scene . . . When you think of Phil Harris, you think of rhythm and finger-snapping and moving to the beat, and that's the kind of thing we were looking for."

    Own a piece of animation history today! $1,895 framed

  • Original Walt Disney Production Cel on Production Background Featuring Cinderella

    Walt Disney's classic "Cinderella" is turning 70 in 2020! What is it, exactly, that makes Cinderella such a timeless character? The story goes so far back through so many cultures that no one actually knows where or when it began.

    Mary Walsh, the managing director of the Animation Research Library at Walt Disney Animation Studios said “When you're talking about this film being almost 70 years old and what are the aspects of it that make it endure even in today's world, I think Cinderella, as a character, her ability to persevere and to be resilient, and to still be kind and respectful to people even though she was faced with a lot of challenges, I think a lot of us go through that today…That optimism, I think is so important. I think that's one of the reasons it stays with us, along with the beautiful artistry of the film.”

    Critic Craig Butler said, "Ilene Woods makes a marvelous Cinderella, her voice a combination of girlishness and sophistication; she also possesses a serenity and assurance which makes one feel she is more in control of her life than might be guessed by her surroundings.” At the time of actress Irene Woods' death, Charles Solomon told the Los Angeles Times, "one of the things about her performance is the warmth she gave the character. As soon as she began to speak, her voice meshed with Marc Davis' animation to create a heroine you liked instantly."

    Own a piece of animation history today! Call for Value

  • Original Walt Disney Production Cel from Song of the South

    Song of the South is a 1946 American live-action/animated musical film produced by Walt Disney based on the Uncle Remus stories. Uncle Remus is the fictional title character and narrator of a collection of black American folktales compiled and adapted by Joel Chandler Harris and published in book form in 1881.

    It was Disney's first film to feature live actors, who provide a sentimental frame story for the animated segments. The film depicts the character Uncle Remus, relating to several children, including the film's protagonist, the folk tales of the adventures of anthropomorphic Br'er Rabbit and his enemies, Br'er Fox and Br'er Bear.

    In this scene, Brer Rabbit gets tied up in one of Brer Fox’s traps. As the story goes, Brer Rabbit tricks Brer Bear into switching places with him by saying “I’m keeping the crows out of the cornfield. Making a dollar a minute.” Brer Bear wants to earn a dollar a minute, so they switch places just in time for Mr. Fox to arrive and realize that Brer Rabbit got away once again.

    James Baskett was voted an Academy Honorary Award for his portrayal of Uncle Remus, Brer Rabbit, and Brer Fox’, the first African-American man to win any kind of Oscar. Own a piece of Animation History today! SOLD